Poem, “I Can’t Breathe”


Picture Source: National Geographic

.If the world didn’t call out your name

You would be just one more number

Not the first nor the last…

Just another one… biting the dust…

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But,

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We’re weary of seeing blood being shed

Especially, by those who are meant to protect…

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Except, he was pinned to the ground, unarmed!

“They’re killing me,” he said to his mum…

It’s a life that God gave and called her to deliver

When I think of it, as a mother, I shiver…

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Mr. president, please, let’s call it what it is…

Not a sad incident nor a bad situation

Let’s call it “murder”, shall we?

That was the intention!

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Third degree? Questionably…

“I can’t breathe,” he said, repeatedly…

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“If you can say you can’t breathe, you’re breathing.”

Mr. Mayor, what the heck?

Would you like him to elaborate,

with a knee on his neck?

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Mr. officer kept pressing that knee into him

While the whole world watched…

We, too, were gasping for air…

It made us feel sick, filled us with despair…

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Even now, we’re holding our breath –

We want justice, for this premature death…

You can’t handle a man like he’s null and void

His life did matter. His name was George Floyd.

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 “Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me…” Psalm 23:4

Mirage, Marriage, Memoir – Poem


Domestic Violence Freedom – Poem

He looked good and had a lot,
So she entered the mirage –
Only, she had failed to notice
Ugliness & lack, inside.
Their mirage turned to a marriage
From hell – especially for her…
Technically, it was not a marriage –
She was not the only girl.
Damn. Had she known before.
Man! Had she shut that door.

Now, things are not as they were
And there’s another… inside of her.
They remain together –
Every day is deader.
Well, at least for her –
He just doesn’t care.
She is black & blue,
Although born to the white race,
With red cigarette marks
All over her face…
“She’s such a good girl”, they say.

“How?! She doesn’t smoke…”, they ask.
They don’t want to dig too deep –
She feels “safe” behind her mask…
Many years ago,
Mum & dad (without a dime)
Saw their ‘once upon a time’…
Very quickly, in one voice,
They affirmed her choice.
They knew she would share the good life
‘Yes, our girl’s a rich man’s wife!’

Only now,
There’s too much drama
For daddy and mama…
And,
They feel like she failed
Because money’s still scarce –
They do get their share, but
they spend & they spend…
She is all alone, except…
There is Another inside of her.

She is finally getting there –
Fed up with sweet little lies
Turned to big & bitter crimes.
She is bound & very tired,
But she can pretend no more –
Keeps on choking on his waves,
But she’s swimming to the shore.
There’s a miracle there, for her…
Husband doesn’t want divorce,
But… he doesn’t really care.
Technically, he is not her husband –
She is not the only girl.

Now, she knows…
A graveyard may look like a park
Until you see its grave stones…
Finally, she’s been hurt enough –
He’s fractured enough of her bones.
Mirage turned into a marriage
Is becoming a memoir…
He will need to find an ashtray
To extinguish his cigar.

Poem from “Love, don’t Fear” – Poetry Collection

During lockdown and beyond, let’s look out for the victims of domestic violence. Their wounds may not be as obvious as “red cigarette marks all over her face”… ♥

Developmental Editing – What a Novel Idea: Part 1


My Novel Writing & Editing Journey…

I remember when I wrote my very first fiction book – over ten years ago. I was so proud of it. I must have produced about 50,000 words and I could not wait to unleash my ‘masterpiece’ on the world…🖋️

I did actually submit it to one publishing house (this is such a funny story – I might share it one day). I received a standard, polite rejection i.e. “…Keep writing. This story isn’t there just yet…” So, I listened to the advice and continued to write. I even got myself a bunch of writing and editing jobs at various UK based publications. It paid off. Today, I am a much better writer than I was 10 years ago. Although, hopefully, not as good as I will be in 10 years from now… We should never stop growing…

Anyway, the above-mentioned manuscript was the first draft of what could have eventually become a good book. Now I know what I didn’t know then – first drafts are not final products… First drafts are basically writers telling their stories to themselves… Books need to be edited – over and over again. Good writers are re-writers… This post is about what I have learned (so far) while developmentally editing my first novel.

If you’re after non-fiction editing tips – please read my previous post HERE.

Developmental editing is the very first editing level. As the name implies, it is meant to develop the heart of a story. It is about the big picture too. And, it is the most time consuming and labour-intensive editing level. Although, I find it to be quite creative and fun – at least, in fiction.

Most self-published authors do developmental edits themselves because paying someone to do them can be very costly. Plus, most editors in the marketplace are copy-editors. Whereas, those who provide developmental editing services usually do not do the work themselves. They just show the writer where their manuscript falls short and how it can be improved.

Personally, I would not even let anyone make arbitrary changes to my fictional story because it is my story and I am the only one who knows its core. With that said, I did hire an editor… So far, I have used some of her advice as well as a few suggestions by another storyteller whose professional feedback I respect. However, none of them made the changes. Both gave me ideas and showed me where the book (chapter one actually) was not working for them… Some of their advice rang true hence I embraced it and made the changes accordingly. I did touch on that in my other post titled,‘Creative Writing – Novel vs. Non-Fiction vs. Poetry.’

One of the observations my editor made was that my protagonist’s internal conflict was introduced too early and with too much emotional intensity. The reader hadn’t been given enough time to get to know or develop empathy for the character… In consequence, they could not feel nor understand her pain. To fix it, I was advised to take the reader back in time  which I did (with flashbacks). I spent some time introducing the character’s likable personality traits and her emotional motivations too. One suggestion was to take her back to her childhood which I did as well – watch my  brief book reading excerpt here – 1 min video.

I’ve been writing for over ten years and intuitively know when a story is missing something even if I don’t know what it is… yet. But I have not published a novel yet, so apart from working with an editor, I have been researching successful novelists and listening to their teachings on what to pay attention to – during the developmental editing stage. I recommend that you do the same.

Story structure is one of those important things… And, I realised that I needed to re-arrange a few chapters so that the inciting incident can happen when it’s supposed to. According to my brief research, it should occur somewhere within the first 20 – 30 pages of a novel. Right now, mine happens somewhere between pages 40 and 50. Hence, my plan’s to change the order of chapters three and four… It’s a good thing that, although subsequent events must make sense, they don’t have to be introduced in a linear order (again, that’s something that my editor reminded me about).

According to my understanding, the inciting incident is that point in your story (usually an external event) that sets the plot in motion. After it happens, your protagonist’s life changes and it will never be the same, at least not until their problem gets resolved or situation changes. I’ll just use an example we can all relate to now (sadly). If I was writing a novel about the pandemic, my inciting incident might be – a scientist releasing the virus (from a laboratory)… Its release (the inciting incident) causes many deaths, and the world in which my protagonist lives goes into a global lockdown…  

The verb ‘to incite’ means ‘to stir up’ or ‘to encourage’ – it comes from a Latin verb meaning ‘to move into action’… So, the inciting incident forces your protagonists to “spend the rest of the novel” trying to find their way back into the old or a new normal.

The inciting incident doesn’t have to be as dramatic as the above mentioned i.e. nobody has to die. It needn’t even be a negative one, but it should hook the reader by creating conflict, high enough stakes and unanswered questions that set the story in motion like never before. The inciting incident is a big topic amongst novelists. Most of them agree that it should happen asap because if it’s introduced too late readers might lose interest…

Back to my example, if I were writing a fictional story about the outbreak: prior to the incident, I would spend some time introducing my protagonists in their normal environment. But I might also want to leave some clues about the virus’ lethal power while foreshadowing the possibility of its unleashing on the unsuspecting world… All this should be done at the developmental editing stage, at the latest…

So, that is where I am with my novel, now – restructuring, adding, and taking away… And learning a lot, along the way… I am going to write more about my editing journey in part two and maybe even part three. If you’re interested in all that, please do stay tuned… One thing that remains certain about developmental editing is that it is not a novel idea at all. Every book needs it – although some need it more than others do… 🙂

Monika Ribeiro © 2020

 

TV Script Editor Interview – Storytelling


Interview - AmyLights, camera, action! 😂 TV script editor Amy Reith has worked with some of the greatest story minds (arguably) – in various roles – across BBC4’s, Sky One’s and Sky Atlantic’s productions…

What I really like about Amy though is that she’s a sweet and down to earth woman… I’ll let you know how we met (funny story) – in part 2 of the interview… 🙂

Meanwhile, as always, we’ll be chatting about writing and storytelling. Besides, we’ll dive into writing for TV specifically. Without further ado, if you are or aspire to be a writer of any kind or TV script editor maybe, this interview should answer at least some of your ‘how to’ questions. Let’s do this!

M: What’s your academic background? Briefly describe your career progression.

A: I attended the local comprehensive school and then went on to study at the University of Exeter – my course was ‘English and Creative Media’ – which essentially means I changed my mind halfway through the course and they had to make up a title for it!

I studied modules varying from English literature and film theory to creative writing and web design, so it was an interesting mix.

When I graduated, I moved back to my hometown, saved up for a year and then relocated to London. On reflection, it was quite a naïve move. I didn’t have a job, so just temped to pay the bills and hoped I’d eventually get some work in TV or film – thankfully, somehow, (after lots of temp admin jobs to pay the bills…) it paid off!

M: What productions have you worked on so far?

A: My first set of credits are all across documentary shows. The first company I worked for made both drama and documentary projects, so I worked as a production assistant/coordinator across their shows and visited the set of a film they were involved in – Kajaki – in Jordan. Then, I moved over into development where we had a large slate of varied projects. In terms of productions, I worked across shows like the BBC4 comedy Bucket, was in the initial writers’ room for the Sky One show Bulletproof and then worked on Sky Atlantic’s Riviera for seasons 2 and 3. I finished on that at Christmas and started on a new project in January.

M: What was your workday like at Riviera? What does a TV script editor do?

A: One of the best bits about script editing is the variety – depending on where you are in the process, no two days are the same.

Initially, you often have a writers’ room – which usually includes the executive team, story team and writers all working through the characters, themes, storylines etc. Then, once the writers go off to work on their episodes – you become their point of contact, helping them when needed with their outlines, scene-by-scenes and scripts, while also working across any production documents needed – such as writing character bios, series outlines, casting documents etc.

During the drafting process you’re on hand to read the new drafts as they come in, make your own notes, then collate them with notes from the showrunner, execs, producer and director and feed them back to the writer.

Once you get closer to filming, you spend a lot of time liasing with production staff – making sure what the writers are working on fits with the schedule, locations and budget. I’ve also spent time on tech recces, which is really useful to get a feel for the geography and layout of the locations and understand what the director is planning in terms of their blocking for each scene.

Once you’re in production, you’re usually working on the drafts of future episodes while also covering amendments to the scenes being filmed and issuing these out to the coordinator for distribution. A lot of the time you’re based in the office of the production company running the show but once it’s filming, you’re often back and forth to the production office and locations.

M: On that note, some of those are quite fancy. Reportedly, Riviera season 2 was filmed in various locations such as Monaco and Nice as well as Alpes-Maritimes in the South of France – with many recognisable landmarks in the background. 🙂

 M: What are the most and the least enjoyable bits of the script editor role?

For me, each stage has its enjoyable moments and its challenges – the initial storylining process is usually the most freeing and creative, but can also feel like it moves slower than you’d like, while the adrenaline of filming is exciting and invigorating, but often the busiest and most stressful stage of the job.

M: How many writers did you manage? What are the main challenges of creating stories with a team of writers?

A: Across both seasons of Riviera, we had five writers working on the show. I’d say in the early stages of storylining, the biggest challenge is making sure that everyone’s ideas align with the tone and voice of the show. All of the writers we worked with are brilliant in their own right, and have strong, powerful voices on the page, so helping them find the right pitch for the show so that it doesn’t feel disjointed is the initial goal. But, thankfully, they’re all total pros, so this was never a big problem!

Once you get into the scripting process, it’s not really a challenge, but one of the most important things I do early on is work out how each writer works. Some people like to discuss their episode then go away and work independently until they’re ready to deliver. Some will discuss it, go away and then touch base sporadically until the deadline, while some like to keep a more regular contact, batting questions and ideas back and forth. My job is to be on hand for them – so I can adjust to any rhythm once I know what they prefer.

M: What part of writing/storytelling can be, and which one cannot be taught?

A: I think there’s elements of the craft that can be taught – from the basic stuff like learning how to use Final Draft and the correct layout to knowing how to write a scene-by-scene etc, but I believe a lot of writing and storytelling comes from instinct.

Just getting a feeling for what works, what doesn’t, what excites you and the people you’re working with versus what doesn’t. Millions of books have been written about storytelling – and most of them completely contradict each other.

I don’t think there’s one format that should be adhered to, and we’re lucky enough that in the current TV market, people are getting braver about diverting from previous structures imposed on shows.

M: What are the main lessons you’ve learned while working on TV productions (i.e. on storytelling e.g. how to weave a good  story, etc.)? 

A: Working in development and as a script editor has, I think, been the absolute best place to learn story and structure. Personally, with my own writing, I’ve always found the precise intricacies of plotting – the logic, the pacing etc. – the hardest part, so having had the opportunity to work with some really brilliant story minds has been invaluable. You quickly learn what works, what doesn’t, what is overused and what feels original.

Also, just watching how different people work – whether it be executive producers, story producers, fellow script editors or writers. I find it fascinating to see the way everyone’s ideas develop and the methods they use for structuring a story.

In TV, I find there’s an interesting balance between creativity and the actual craft of making a show. The former is essential, but when you are constantly working to deadlines, schedules and notes from varying quarters, it’s also about finding a way to get the scripts ready to shoot without compromising on the creativity.

M: What advice would you give to people who want to write for TV? Where should they begin?

A: Having asked this question many times, I know how frustrating it is when people just say ‘write’ – as if just writing your own material will suddenly get it seen and get you a job. It usually makes me irrationally angry to hear it, but I’m going to become what I hate, because I do recommend writing as much as you can in your spare time – not because it will get you work – but because it really is a case of the more you write, the better you become.

Everyone’s route into writing for TV is different – some come from editorial, some juggle writing with directing/producing, a lot are playwrights who move across. For me though, I think working as part of a story/editorial team is invaluable experience – so the first step to this is to become a researcher/assistant script editor. As far as I know, long running dramas in the UK usually hire people on 6-month fixed contracts, so advertise quite regularly for roles like this. Similarly working in development is also really useful as you work across a large slate of projects, so see ideas and shows at their inception, and get to work with a varied set of writers.

M: How do you recognise a writer’s style? How can one find/understand their unique voice?

A: I always love chatting with writers for the first time and finding out what they’re interested in. Often, people who write lots of episodes of TV can adapt their voice and tone for the show they’re working on, they’ve become pros at it, but diving in and finding out what they really are interested in is fascinating.

I mean, usually people always seem to want to write much darker things than they’re currently working on (take from that what you will…!) You can, often, tell quickly whether people skew towards wanting to find the heart of a piece, or the action and excitement, the comedy or the tragedy.

M: How does one know which area of writing to pursue?

A: I think the best thing to do is try everything – try writing a novel,try poetry, try screenwriting or writing a play, try articles, reviews, find what works and what doesn’t and don’t feel like you have to settle for just one thing.

M: What makes a good writer?

A: There’s so many different answers to this question, but I think at the heart of it, it’s about connecting with what you’re writing.

Whether you’re writing a novel that inspires escapism, a specific genre of TV show, a gritty, realistic film or something more avant-garde, if you’re not getting something back from writing – enjoyment, catharsis, or anything else, then it’s hard to get something on the page that people will associate with.

To be continued…✍🏽

Creative Writing – Novels vs. Nonfiction vs. Poetry


Creative Writing - Novel Writing
Creative Writing – Novel Writing

I’m a trained non fiction editor and journalist. I’m also a self-taught poet with two poetry books to my name. I enjoy locating problems with non fiction pieces and love seeing the fruits of good editing.

Non fiction writing and editing are relatively straight forward. They’re all about reality and research. You don’t have to remember made up characters nor look for creative ways to make things happen. In non fiction, things have already happened (most of the time). Your focus is on conveying your knowledge in the most interesting and factual way. Poetry and short story manuscripts are fine too. They’re relatively short and sweet (in the context of editing). You begin to see results relatively fast which encourages you to press on.

Fiction writing and editing though… That’s a whole ‘nother story…

The first draft of my novel is done. I’m thrilled about that, but first drafts are soooo imperfect. In my experience, most of the work happens between the first and the final draft of a book. Here are three things that helped me so far…

Planning My Novel (A Rough Outline)

I’m a pantser – not a plotter. Meaning: I let the story lead the way and allow characters to show me who they are and where they want to go. I figure stuff out as I go along. That’s just my natural inclination which is fine. With that said, I’m discovering that it is beneficial to plan my novel, even if it’s just a rough outline…

The average novel wordcount falls between 60.000 – 90.000 words. That’s a lot of words. It’s easy to lose the plot (literally and figuratively speaking). Again, collections of poems and/or short stories are different in that respect. Individual poems/stories should be connected thematically somehow. However, you don’t have to remember details of poem number two or story number three to nail the ones in the middle of your collection. Poems and short stories are standalones. Chapters of your novel – not so. They’re interdependent. You need to remember what your characters have gone through at the beginning of your book to be able to take them all the way through… to the end.

Ultimately, every project is about crossing that finish line. For an aspiring novelist, that line is the final draft of their novel. It’s about getting there a little faster. Writers are re-writers. Editing, re-writing, revising, re-writing, editing and revising some more are unavoidable… But, a plan can save one a few rounds of hovering over their manuscript. As they say, who fails to plan plans to fail.

Asking for Feedback

Novel writing is a new territory for me. I’m sure it will become easier if/as I continue to write fiction… However, to make this process a little smoother (now) I ask for feedback, every now and again.

You have to Be Careful Whom You Ask Though. Not everyone’s qualified nor responsible enough to speak into your story. The person/s should be competent and able to provide their observations in a constructive way. But then, there’s also the right and the wrong way to receive feedback. Be open-minded. Don’t be afraid of critical evaluation. Embrace what resonates with you. 

creative writingThe “critic” whose advice resonated with me the most is a former journalist/newspaper editor. Her honest feedback helped me acknowledge that I started my novel in the wrong place. I’m using the word ‘acknowledge’ because I kind of sort of knew that my beginning could be problematic. My main characters’ conflict was too intense, introduced too soon, etc. I think I might have been secretly hoping to get away with it… A competent, well-meaning critic will not allow you to get away with things. They’ll tell you how it is… So… Reiterating… Good feedback, however heart-breaking it may be, is your friend. Welcome it and… Start Your Novel in the Right Place.

As you may already know, I went back to the drawing board. And now, my opening is sooo much better. So much so that English teacher and bestselling author Desiri Okobia asked if she could use my first page for year 11’s creative writing lessons… Whaaaat? It’s a big deal – especially that this is my very first opening to my very first novel… I know I’ve digressed a little, but novel writing is a quest, so it’s important to Celebrate Small Victories…  

Letting IT Rest

Another thing that has always worked for me, with poetry and now with my novel manuscript too, is letting it rest for some time. If you’re working to a tight deadline, that may not be possible. However, if you can, leave your first draft alone for a month or even longer… Don’t edit, don’t re-write, don’t even re-read it. Distance yourself from your AAAMAZING story and come back to it with a fresh pair of eyes. Bear in mind, once your emotions subside, the story might seem a little less aaamazing. It is a good thing though because now you’re able to see what needs to be changed… The opposite of that might be true too. You might come back to your manuscript and find that it’s good enough (first drafts never are though).

I know… Letting it rest might be annoying when you just want to get on with it,

or… like me… you’ve told the world,

“Hey! I’m writing a novel!”

And now, the world keeps asking,

“Hey! So, when’s the novel coming out then?

“Errr… Soon.”

Sometimes, “soon” is all there is to say… Personally, I prefer to take my time and produce an excellent piece of writing rather than produce something mediocre quickly…

There’s so much more to be said about this novel writing process, but I’ll end here for now. If you have just began or you’re thinking about writing a novel, I hope this is helpful…

Let’s write this novel, shall we? Yes, we shall! 😉

Please SUBSCRIBE HERE to receive the first chapter of my novel… soon.:)

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One More Poem – Shielded Memories


Picture taken from Barbara Campbell’s Facebook Profile

I had said that while working on my novel I’d put the brakes on writing poetry. And, I have kept to that until now. However,on Wednesday, my friend/mentor’s body was cremated. I had been invited to say a few words at her funeral…

Barbara was a big supporter of my poetry and often expressed her desire to be in the audience when I performed. Sadly, that never happened, but I thought a brief speech in poetry form was what she would have appreciated.

She died from dementia. I couldn’t stop crying every time I saw her in the final years of her life. In the most difficult times, her family and friends saw things that most would probably wish to unsee… While that’s impossible, my prayer for them and anyone who lost a loved one to this or any other monster disease is that the beautiful memories become more powerful in their minds than the bad ones.

Dementia is crude and cruel. However, Babs was and will always be a lady in my mind. I wrote this short, simple poem to celebrate that memory of her.

She is gone, but her legacy and the beautiful memories live on.

Lady B.

I call you ‘Lady’ – ‘Lady B.’ actually

International woman filled with dignity

A little stern when need be but sweet when you knew

That your heart was safe and a friendship was true…

 

So many friendships are make-believe.

 

You did not find your El Dorado. There was not enough time.

But the monster that ended your quest cannot stop you now!

You were such a star… I felt warm in your light…

We know you were here. You don’t have to fight…

Anymore.

 

I still laugh thinking of you speaking Patois to me

I am not Jamaican, but felt I could be…

When we laughed.

You left solid love chunks for your people down here…

And, you left quite a few… just for me.

 

Thank you for your time and mentoring –

Not only in good journalism or editing skill…

Thank you for your heartening when I wanted to quit.

 

You’ll be missed, Lady B.

That is who you are and will be to me…

I’ll remember your passion moving past the pain!

I’ll remember your laughter in spite of the rain

And the violent storm that came…

 

It is gone now.

It’s okay, Lady B.

Wait in Him for us… R.I.P.♥

 

Written by Monika Ribeiro

                                                                                                                                                      In loving memory of Barbara Campbell

7 Answers – Interview & Introduction


7 Questions.jpgA few months ago, I was featured in “Seven Questions…” – a popular column of a UK based newspaper for the Polish diaspora. The interview format was quite unusual. I was given a number of one word/two-word questions to choose from and asked to develop answers based on whatever reflections they triggered in my mind.

When the interview came out I promised my English-speaking readers its translation, so here it comes – slightly adapted for this blog but true to the heart of our conversation.

Monika Ribeiro

Writer, Poet. Published two books with inspiring poetry and short stories – “Do Lend Me Your Ears” and “Love, don’t Fear” – currently writing her third book (epic novel). She comes from Poland, completed a master’s degree course in marketing and management at the University of Szczecin. She has lived in London for the past 15 years.

Colour

Black and white, hence brown… like my skin which reflects the fusion of two cultures – Nigerian (my dad’s side) and Polish (my mum’s). My parents met when they were students at the Technical University of Lodz. For the first few months after I was born, subsequently every now and then: I’ve lived there with them – in a student home. Skin colour means nothing because we all belong to one race – human race.

Place

The old town of Barcelona. The beach, sun, museums, beautiful antique buildings, music… One of my visits, about 4 years ago, is especially engraved in my memory. One morning, in the search of peace I discovered Museu Frederic Marés… I spent half of my day there – writing, staring at tourists and artists immersed in high-focus drawing… I lost the sense of time. On the other hand, London is the city where I don’t feel different – where I can get lost in the crowd. Here, I met my husband Miguel, started my adult life and gave birth to three kids.

Life’s Motto

Never Give Up because Nothing is Impossible. This thought subtly but consistently re-appears in my poetry and life choices.

Join me on Insta

Hobby

Writing. It’s my passion, therapy and career choice. It’s great when a reader or listener comes back to tell me how much they appreciate my creations, but the writing process is just as important as the final effect. During the process, I experience an emotional catharsis and feelings stronger than those I get whilst travelling because when you write you’re allowed to create new places instead of merely discovering them. The book I’m working on now is about love, friendship, the pursuit of happiness, finding God and fighting for your dream…

Music

It has to be positive and spirit lifting. Melody, of course, is important but first and foremost, I care about the lyrics and the atmosphere a musical piece creates…

Book

The Bible. 15 years ago, I was in Paris visiting Ayo (who authored the foreword to my book “Love, don’t Fear”). One evening, in preparation for travel, she was packing her suitcase: clothes, jewellery, a storm of colours. What struck me was that, in spite of a relatively small travel-bag, she packed three bibles – English, German and French… Many things have happened since then, but the Scriptures still are my main spiritual food. They helped me get rid of a few-year long depression and they’re the source of daily wisdoms I have not found in any other book.

Film

“Rocky” with Sylvester Stallone. A story about a small-time boxer realising his dreams of becoming the heavy-weight world champion. I watched the series a few times and will probably watch them again. Highlights – literal and metaphorical battle, facing his opponent but mostly himself, love… Main message – fight until the end, don’t lose faith, love and respect others…

 

If you speak Polish, see the first pic above with the original interview. Join me on Instagram too. 

Extraordinary Things in Ordinary Places


Two weeks have passed since my poetry evening. I’ve had some time to reflect and would love to share my thoughts with you…

After-Party Poetry Evening.jpg

The event was a success. The venue turned out to be the right one, and it was full. Due to previously mentioned last-minute changes, I had less than 3,5 weeks to promote the show, hence filling it up was probably one of my main concerns…

Testimonial Joanna.jpgSome of the words attendees used to describe this poetry evening were: eclectic, organic, inclusive, something different… Paul, one of the guests, said that it was “an interesting, colourfully put together event”. 😊 David, another guest, apart from leaving a solid testimonial in the pic above, said the event was “low key, but nice”… People got inspired to write, create and many met other like-minded folks. Yuppie! For the purpose of this post, however, I would like to zero in on David’s initial thoughts – low key but nice…

Ostentatious is, in my opinion, the best antonym of low key. This event wasn’t that… I’m not saying there’s something wrong with showy presentations, but they’re not in my nature. Plus, if I’m honest, I didn’t have an “ostentatious” budget this time around.

Testimonial Desiri.jpgWell, even though my poetry evening could be considered low–profile – we had some interesting guests in our midst. There were award-winning authors, publishers and other creatives who’re experts in their respective fields. Why is this important? Because they’re the ones who can teach budding or fellow creative-entrepreneurs a thing or two about their craft… Then again, I think that some of the lessons many super–talented (especially young) creatives need the most are life lessons which you don’t learn at school.

I found the following claim in an article by independent.co.uk: “For people in Britain, everyday problems can seem like the end of the world – and most of us are guilty of complaining about things like bad weather…” I’m guilty as charged (every now and then)… It was extremely hot on the day! After the event, a few of us met at a local café… I had only brief conversations with most people, but one of them still resonates with me. The guest’s a filmmaker, whose first film won the Palme D’or at the 50th Cannes Film Festival. We spoke a little about her films which was fantastic, however, what struck me the most was what she said about preparation.

She said she didn’t like to complain about things she couldn’t change, and the weather (hot, cold, or rainy…) made no difference to her. She said – the only people who complain about things are those who aren’t prepared… The topic of preparation is deep and wide – it can include many different aspects, besides the weather. Yet, my take away from the conversation’s that preparation is key, and as the saying goes – by failing to prepare, you prepare to fail…  

Extraordinary things do happen in ordinary places. Don’t take people for granted or you’ll miss whatever help God may be trying to send your way. Also, remember – help isn’t always material. Sometimes, it is the right word at just the right time. I hope this helps.

‘Twas a good evening, everybody. Track my event journey by checking out the previous post and by following me on Facebook and Instagram @monikaribeiro.writer.

Poetry Evening – Only 7 Days Away


Free Poetry Event London

I’m beginning to get those butterflies whenever I think that my first poetry evening in years is only 7 days away! Thank God, in spite of initial roadblocks, I’m calm and positive about it… All in all, those are friendly butterflies – they can stay, for now, as long as they don’t misbehave.

It’s not butterflies that make this event special though, but the artists who offered to contribute… Poetry Evening with Monika Ribeiro & Friends Line-up Includes:

Lyrical Healer – Bestselling Author, Poet/Singer whose work was featured on BBC iPlayer, Virgin TV, BBC London radio…

Desiri Okobia – Author, Poet, English Literature Teacher…

PK Boadi – Multiple Award-Winning Gospel Musician…

Avril Swift – Theatre Actress as seen in “Daisy pulls it off” at the Miller Centre Theatre Company Productions…

Nigel Swift Contributes at a Theatre; Plays the Flute…

Monika Ribeiro – Author, Poet as seen in Polish Weekly, Goniec Polski, Nigeria MagazineBlack Heritage Today…

You may remember Lyrical Healer, aka Winsome Duncan, from my interview with her (on the subject of creative entrepreneurship). On that note, this event is also an opportunity to network with like-minded creative entrepreneurs.

Likewise, I had already introduced the author of “Diaries of a Visionary” and “Bodel” – Desiri Okobia who did a great job at recording the voice-over for my poem titled “I saw her smile”.

PK Boadi is a multi–award–winning Gospel musician whom I’ve also mentioned a few times before. Moreover, in my “other life”, as a journalist, I wrote about him winning AGMA Discovery of the Year 2012. He has won many more awards since then…

Avril Swift, in January this year, played Alice Fitzpatrick in “Daisy pulls it off” by an Irish screenwriter Denise Deegan. Having seen Avril in action, on a few occasions, I fell in love with her dramatic expressions. I’m super glad that she’ll be a part of this eve.

Nigel Swift, too, is an occasional actor who happens to play the flute beautifully. When he plays, I feel transported to another – very tranquil place in my mind.

Both Avril and Nigel will read and perform from my books “Love, don’t Fear” and “Do Lend Me Your Ears”. Topping it all off, Nigel will play a few beautiful melodies on his flute as well… 

I have no doubt that this will be an evening worth remembering… Still, if you’re unsure if it’s for you, find MORE INFORMATION HERE and/or watch out for brief previews in my Instagram Stories. I plan to post them daily starting from tomorrow…

Let’s Meet Offline. 😊